Sands Construction

Where Have We Been?

We have been busy, with little time for posting on the site.  The stars aligned for the production of CD's simultaneously on a two new residences (one on a fabulous waterfront  Johns Island property and one by the beach on Seabrook) while designing a couple of downtown renovations that required City of Charleston BAR approval, and a contemporary renovation of a Seabrook residence with incredible views.  A sail on the harbor today to take in some of the Race Week action gave me a chance to sweep out some mental clutter and think about something to post. Sandy Barton and his crews with Sands Construction have completed the addition to and  renovation of a residence on Kiawah Island.  I thought it would be fun to post a couple of images of this project that I took last week, as as one rear elevation image from before we began the design work.

Rear elevation, Kiawah Island renovation and addition overlooking the Kiawah River.

Kiawah Island residence, before renovation/addition.

This renovation was mainly focused on adding a new partial third level above existing living spaces.  The left side of the house (from garage to new master suite, and including the kitchen) was completely renovated or all new.  The right-most side of the residence was left alone, save for repainting the interior and refinishing the exterior to match the new materials. Sandy did a fabulous job taking our design and wrenching this mess of 1980's construction, which had been partially renovated a decade ago, into superior shape.

The deck features a reoriented stair to maximize useable space for gathering, plus new pie decking and custom designed newels and cable rail.

 

Kiawah Renovation/Addition Progresses

The addition and renovation to this Kiawah Island residence continues. Front elevation, with traditional elements integrated in a previous renovation, before current addition and renovation work was initiated.

Sometimes, the work that you produce that seems the least transformational is also the most difficult to pull off. When confronted with a renovation of a house of middling construction and that has already undergone another partial renovation, and with a budget realistically limited due to market considerations, the challenges can be substantial.  We are pleased with the way that the design and construction of this renovation/addition has come out so far, however, and can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

The installer from K&K Custom Cabinets works to set out the new kitchen cabinetry.

The project is chiefly a substantial third floor addition, which includes a new master suite and a den over what was the vaulted living spaces.  We designed the floor plate of the new addition be be 9'-3" above the existing finished floor to keep the appropriate ceiling volume in the living room, dining room and kitchen without growing the height of the house to be too tall proportionally. Along with the addition of the new space, a stair was needed to access it, leading to some necessary renovations to the former master shower.  Our clients also elected to completely renovate the kitchen, add a new stair for interior access to the garage, and replace existing 6'-6" tall sliding doors addressing the principal views with 8' tall units, enhancing the views substantially.

A new Ipe and stainless steel cable rail system will help to finish out the new third level porch and rebuilt principal deck.

Kiawah Residence before, having been renovated once before already to begin a transformation from an 80's contemporary to a shingle style flavor.

Dreaming about No Rain

Living spaces covered with tarp after majority of roof demotion has been completed. In recent weeks when we have asked our three year old son what, if anything, he could recall dreaming about the previous night, he has been likely to answer, "I dreamed of no rain." We've no idea in what this line of dreaming is rooted, but Sands Construction, Tyler A. Smyth Architect LLC, and the client that we are collaborating with all hope that his dreams come true, if only for the next week or so.  Finished Australian Cypress flooring, known to be temperamental when exposed to moisture, and other interior finishes and insulation would greatly benefit from some dry weather.

View from the entry foyer into the living spaces, where the roof once was.

We have been designing the renovation and addition to this Kiawah Island residence for some time now, and the work is underway.  Sands Construction, serving as contractor, first completed the interior demolition and has now removed the existing roof from the areas that will receive the additional living spaces above.  All of the structural material has been on site and waiting for fair weather, which is upon us.  We're all excited to really kick off the project.

Dreaming of no rain,

Tyler

Retrofitting existing piers found to be hollow with structural grout; piers will be added where necessary to appropriately shore up the foundation.

Sandy Barton discusses concrete work beneath a new garage stair with the concrete finishing crew.

 

Conceptual Study for Kiawah Island Residence

Rear elevation study of Kiawah Island residence rendered on Friday.

Our friends at Sands Construction asked that we look at potential improvements for a residence near the beach in Kiawah Island's Vanderhorst Plantation. A discussion with the homeowner followed a few days later.

Existing rear elevation of Kiawah residence.

We were asked to give some thought to potential improvements of an existing residence on Kiawah.  At the end of Friday, I decided to work on it a little bit.  I put this sketch together illustrating a concept that would open up the rear elevation to a fabulous pool that is otherwise largely blocked from view.

The design pulls elements from the palette of the existing architecture while adding the warmth of wood with a suggested Sapele mahogany ceiling and ipe deck at the second level.  A piano curve shape to the deck edge softens the form and adds a bit of sensuality to this otherwise staid residence.

We suggested eliminating a built-in planter and unnecessary stair, replacing both with an enlargement of the existing brick patio.  A great outdoor kitchen would anchor the space at the end of the raised patio. The existing bluestone pool deck, which gets fearfully hot in the summertime, would be replaced by cooler light walnut travertine.